2011 Winners

The Garden Club


Harbour View Garden Project 2011

School: Harbour View Elementary

Votes Received: 268

There is a special place hidden away behind Harbour View Elementary School in Coquitlam, B.C. It is a magical place where the members of the Harbour View Garden Club meet at noon every sunny day, and even on not so sunny days. Magical things happen in this little garden. The voices of children excitedly ring out as flowers bloom, bees, bugs and worms scurry about. Little hands are busy digging holes, weeding garden beds and planting seeds for the next harvest. The greatest joy to watch are the little hands digging and creating wondrous tunnels and castles in a sandbox. But it wasn’t always so… 15 years ago the school worked very hard to fundraise and build a garden. Over the years, the garden became overgrown and a site of vandalism. Last year the kids and teachers began to “take back the garden.” In less than a year we have made simple but amazing transformations to the garden. We have cleaned up the garden of debris, weeds and overgrown bushes. We have built a drip irrigation system that is powered by our homemade wind turbine and solar panels. We have raised mason bees, butterflies and worms to help pollinate and make the garden flourish. We have planted corn, carrots, beans, beets, lettuce, radishes, pumpkins, potatoes and countless flowers. Since taking back our garden, vandalism has dropped at the school. Our garden has now become a Green Classroom. This Green Classroom enriches and enhances the learning outcomes across all the curricula; including math, language, science, social studies and especially social responsibility. The Green Classroom involves and captivates every child in our school. Global change begins with the children. Children will affect the changes of today, tomorrow and over the course of their lives. “Children can help to grow a garden … a garden can definitely help to grow our children!”



Mentors Consulted

Grandma Muriel & Grandpa John


Tags

Ecology
Energy
Gardening


 
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